Preventive Dentistry

Regular Dental Checkup

In order to avoid lengthy procedures and maintain a healthy, disease free mouth, we recommend recall visits every 6 months. This allows us to detect early signs of disease and provide appropriate treatment, leading to a favorable prognosis.

Dental Sealants

Sealants protect the occlusal surfaces, inhibiting bacterial growth and providing a smooth surface that increases the probability that the surface will stay clean. The ultimate goal of sealants is for the material to penetrate into the pit and fissures of the tooth and sealing them from bacterial invasion.

Indications for Use

Traditionally, sealants are thought of as a preventive measure for children and teenagers when they are in their “cavity prone years”. Patients who have xerostomia (decreased salivation), are undergoing orthodontic treatment, show evidence of incipient caries, or who are prone to caries should be evaluated as candidates for sealant placement. Primary molars also can benefit from the placement of sealants.

Space Maintainers

Space maintainers are appliances made to custom fit your child’s mouth to maintain the space intended for the permanent tooth when it erupts. Space maintainers do this by “holding open” the empty space left by a lost tooth by preventing movement of the adjacent teeth until the permanent tooth takes its natural position in the child’s mouth. This treatment can prevent much costlier and time demanding orthodontic treatments.

Fluoride Treatment

What is fluoride?

The fluoride ion comes from the element fluorine. Fluoride, either applied topically to erupted teeth, or ingested orally (called systemic fluoride) during tooth development, helps to prevent tooth decay, strengthen tooth enamel, and reduce the harmful effects of plaque. Fluoride also makes the entire tooth structure more resistant to decay and promotes remineralization, which aids in repairing early decay before the damage is even visible.

Where is fluoride found?

Topical Fluoride is found in products containing strong concentrations of fluoride (i.e., toothpastes, mouth rinses), fluoridated varnishes and/or gels either topically applied by a dentist or other oral health professional, or prescribed as an at-home regimen (particularly for persons with a high risk of dental caries).

Systemic Fluoride can be ingested through public and private water supplies and may even be placed in some soft drinks and bottled waters. Once ingested, systemic fluoride is absorbed via the gastrointestinal tract and distributed and deposited throughout the body via the blood supply.

What health risks are associated with fluoride uses?

In general, fluoride consumption is safe. Health risks associated with Fluoridation usually are limited to misuse and over concentration. To avoid misuse and over concentration: Avoid drinking overly fluoridated water – results of this may cause teeth to become discolored, and may cause the enamel of the teeth to look spotted, pitted, or stained (a condition known as dental fluorosis). Avoid swallowing toothpaste and other dental hygiene products. Call the local water department and/or the health department to evaluate the fluoride level in your local drinking reservoir. Children are especially vulnerable to dental fluorosis as their developing teeth are more sensitive to higher fluoride levels. Consult a pediatric dentist or other oral health care professional if you notice changes in the condition of your child’s teeth.